Montgomery County Court

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Montgomery County Texas 210 West Davis Conroe, Texas 7730 936-539-7885

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County Resources


Perform a free Montgomerycountycourt court records search, including marriage, divorce, criminal, arrests, mugshots, and missing persons. DISCLAIMER: Montgomerycountycourt is not operated by, affiliated or associated with any local, state, or federal government or agency. Montgomerycountycourt works with a aggregation site called PeopleConnect that collects government-generated records from public sources and provides fast, easy, and inexpensive access to those records. Because those records are subject to change by the original sources, we cannot guarantee the accuracy, reliability, or timeliness of the content offered on this website. Montgomerycountycourt is not a consumer reporting company as defined by The Fair Credit Reporting Act, 15 USC § 1681 et seq, and cannot be used for the purposes of establishing credit worthiness, employment background checks, tenant screenings, or evaluation of risk related to business transactions. Avoid using Montgomerycountycourt for criminal purposes such as stalking or identity theft, as such utilizations are subject to civil or criminal charges and penalties. Users must agree with the PeopleConnect terms of service before making use of the website.

Montgomery County, Texas, is the third county established in Texas after the birth of the Republic of Texas. In 1837, the county was formed from neighboring Washington County and lies forty miles north of downtown Houston in the East Texas Timberlands Region. Montgomery County was named for Andrew Jackson Montgomery, a descendant of Revolutionary War general Richard Montgomery.

The first county seat was Montgomery, and the first courthouse was built here. Two other courthouses were built in Montgomery, but when the railroad arrived in Montgomery County in 1899, it bypassed the town of Montgomery. After Isaac Conroe moved his lumber company to the junction of the I&GN Railroad, a town grew, and the county seat was moved to Conroe. Montgomery County is part of the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land Texas Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county has a population of 620,443, according to the 2020 census.

County Courthouse

The courthouse and jail were erected in 1891 in the Second Empire style. The jail stood until 1931, when it burned and first in 1901 and 1911 near the courthouse destroyed much of the business district. The courthouse survived. In 1922 the courthouse grounds where an accused black rapist was burned alive. The 1891 courthouse stood until the new courthouse was built in 1936. The design featured a large central building with flanking attached buildings. Originally, the courthouse had a jail on the top floor, which stood there until 1965, when the courthouse was remodeled.

The courthouse built in 1936 still stands, but a sky bridge connected the north side of the 1965 addition to the annex across West Davis Street. The courthouse is located at 301 North Main Street/West Davis Street, a three-story limestone, brick, and concrete structure. The building is located in the center of Conroe. Fourth County District Court Courtrooms and two County Court at Law courtrooms are located on the second and third stories.

The courthouse annex is located at 210 West David Street/N. Thompson Street and is a four-story colored brick, glass, and concrete structure. The building is located in the Center of Conroe on the north side of the courthouse and is connected to the courthouse by a skywalk. This is the Atrium Building and has four County Court at Law courtrooms. Another building completing the courthouse station is a rectangular-shaped building on the north side at 507 West Phillips Street. It contains three District Court courtrooms and is called the Lee G. Allworth Building.

County Clerk

The County Clerk of Montgomery County, Texas, is L. Bandon Steinmann, and he can be reached at 936-539-7885 at the County Courthouse or countyclerk@mctx.org. His duties are to maintain Official Public Records starting in 1836. These are deeds, land patent records, mortgages, judgments, and tax liens.

Use the Montgomery County Clerk Search Menu on this page: https://www.mctx.org/departments/departments_a_-_c/county_clerk/index.php for records.

District Court

The Montgomery County, Texas, Court system is a government institution that resolves legal issues according to local Montgomery County Texas law. Courts are housed in Montgomery County courthouses and are divided into Criminal Courts and Civil Courts. Criminal Courts prosecute cases against parties accused of breaking the law. The Civil Court in Montgomery County resolves disputes between citizens.
Montgomery County, Texas, has 21 courts and serves a population of 535,187 people. There is one court per 25,485 citizens and one per 49 square miles. District Courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction in Texas. The Texas Legislature establishes the area served by each court.
The District Clerk for the County is Melisa Miller, and she can be reached at 936-539-7855 or at 301 N. Main Street #103 Conroe, TX 77301. You can also email Ms. Miller at districtclrk@mctx.org. The district clerk cannot give legal advice but can help you file and retrieve cases and dockets.

Information can be provided, but it “is as is” and no warranty as to content, accuracy validity, reliability, quality, completeness, or timeliness is provided. Forms for copies of district records can be found at https://www.mctx.org/departments/departments_d_-_f/district_clerk/forms.php#.

Justice of the Peace Courts

The Montgomery County District Attorney prosecutes all “C” misdemeanors, including traffic offenses, in Justice of the Peace Courts. That municipality’s city prosecutor handles cases in municipal court. The Montgomery County Justice of the Peace Courts include:

Justice of the Peace Precinct 1
Judge Wayne L. Mack
Willis Location
300 South Danville
Willis, Texas 77378
Phone: 936-539-7801 or 936-856-7949
Fax: 936-788-8399

Montgomery Location
19380 Highway 105 West, Ste 507
Montgomery, Texas 77356
Phone: 936-788-8374 or 281-364-4200
Fax: 936-788-8379
Justice of the Peace Precinct 2
Judge Trey Spikes
2241 North 1st Street
Conroe, Texas 77301
Phone: 936-538-3788
Fax: 936-538-7732

Justice of the Peace Precinct 3
Judge Matt Beasley
1520 Lake Front Circle, Suite 100
The Woodlands, Texas 77380
Phone: 281-364-4284 or 936-539-7803
Fax: 281-367-3947 or 936-539-7959

Justice of the Peace Precinct 4Judge Jason Dunn
22354 Justice Drive
New Caney, Texas 77357
Phone: 281-577-8970 or 936-521-8970
Fax: 936-521-8947 or 281-577-8947

Justice of the Peace Precinct 5
Judge Matt Masden
19100 Unity Park Drive
Magnolia, Texas 77355
Phone: 281-259-6494 or 936-539-7806
Fax: 281-259-6456 or 936-760-6989

Drug Court in Montgomery County

Drug Court is a program for positive change in program participants, staff, and the community. Using innovative practices, the program encourages participants to realize and reach their potential. The program works to enhance public safety by reducing recidivism using consistent evidence-based practices and working with the courts, participants, and treatment providers.

County Resources


Perform a free Montgomerycountycourt court records search, including marriage, divorce, criminal, arrests, mugshots, and missing persons. DISCLAIMER: Montgomerycountycourt is not operated by, affiliated or associated with any local, state, or federal government or agency. Montgomerycountycourt works with a aggregation site called PeopleConnect that collects government-generated records from public sources and provides fast, easy, and inexpensive access to those records. Because those records are subject to change by the original sources, we cannot guarantee the accuracy, reliability, or timeliness of the content offered on this website. Montgomerycountycourt is not a consumer reporting company as defined by The Fair Credit Reporting Act, 15 USC § 1681 et seq, and cannot be used for the purposes of establishing credit worthiness, employment background checks, tenant screenings, or evaluation of risk related to business transactions. Avoid using Montgomerycountycourt for criminal purposes such as stalking or identity theft, as such utilizations are subject to civil or criminal charges and penalties. Users must agree with the PeopleConnect terms of service before making use of the website.

Montgomery County, Texas, is the third county established in Texas after the birth of the Republic of Texas. In 1837, the county was formed from neighboring Washington County and lies forty miles north of downtown Houston in the East Texas Timberlands Region. Montgomery County was named for Andrew Jackson Montgomery, a descendant of Revolutionary War general Richard Montgomery.

The first county seat was Montgomery, and the first courthouse was built here. Two other courthouses were built in Montgomery, but when the railroad arrived in Montgomery County in 1899, it bypassed the town of Montgomery. After Isaac Conroe moved his lumber company to the junction of the I&GN Railroad, a town grew, and the county seat was moved to Conroe. Montgomery County is part of the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land Texas Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county has a population of 620,443, according to the 2020 census.

County Courthouse

The courthouse and jail were erected in 1891 in the Second Empire style. The jail stood until 1931, when it burned and first in 1901 and 1911 near the courthouse destroyed much of the business district. The courthouse survived. In 1922 the courthouse grounds where an accused black rapist was burned alive. The 1891 courthouse stood until the new courthouse was built in 1936. The design featured a large central building with flanking attached buildings. Originally, the courthouse had a jail on the top floor, which stood there until 1965, when the courthouse was remodeled.

The courthouse built in 1936 still stands, but a sky bridge connected the north side of the 1965 addition to the annex across West Davis Street. The courthouse is located at 301 North Main Street/West Davis Street, a three-story limestone, brick, and concrete structure. The building is located in the center of Conroe. Fourth County District Court Courtrooms and two County Court at Law courtrooms are located on the second and third stories.

The courthouse annex is located at 210 West David Street/N. Thompson Street and is a four-story colored brick, glass, and concrete structure. The building is located in the Center of Conroe on the north side of the courthouse and is connected to the courthouse by a skywalk. This is the Atrium Building and has four County Court at Law courtrooms. Another building completing the courthouse station is a rectangular-shaped building on the north side at 507 West Phillips Street. It contains three District Court courtrooms and is called the Lee G. Allworth Building.

County Clerk

The County Clerk of Montgomery County, Texas, is L. Bandon Steinmann, and he can be reached at 936-539-7885 at the County Courthouse or countyclerk@mctx.org. His duties are to maintain Official Public Records starting in 1836. These are deeds, land patent records, mortgages, judgments, and tax liens.

Use the Montgomery County Clerk Search Menu on this page: https://www.mctx.org/departments/departments_a_-_c/county_clerk/index.php for records.

District Court

The Montgomery County, Texas, Court system is a government institution that resolves legal issues according to local Montgomery County Texas law. Courts are housed in Montgomery County courthouses and are divided into Criminal Courts and Civil Courts. Criminal Courts prosecute cases against parties accused of breaking the law. The Civil Court in Montgomery County resolves disputes between citizens.
Montgomery County, Texas, has 21 courts and serves a population of 535,187 people. There is one court per 25,485 citizens and one per 49 square miles. District Courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction in Texas. The Texas Legislature establishes the area served by each court.
The District Clerk for the County is Melisa Miller, and she can be reached at 936-539-7855 or at 301 N. Main Street #103 Conroe, TX 77301. You can also email Ms. Miller at districtclrk@mctx.org. The district clerk cannot give legal advice but can help you file and retrieve cases and dockets.

Information can be provided, but it “is as is” and no warranty as to content, accuracy validity, reliability, quality, completeness, or timeliness is provided. Forms for copies of district records can be found at https://www.mctx.org/departments/departments_d_-_f/district_clerk/forms.php#.

Justice of the Peace Courts

The Montgomery County District Attorney prosecutes all “C” misdemeanors, including traffic offenses, in Justice of the Peace Courts. That municipality’s city prosecutor handles cases in municipal court. The Montgomery County Justice of the Peace Courts include:

Justice of the Peace Precinct 1
Judge Wayne L. Mack
Willis Location
300 South Danville
Willis, Texas 77378
Phone: 936-539-7801 or 936-856-7949
Fax: 936-788-8399

Montgomery Location
19380 Highway 105 West, Ste 507
Montgomery, Texas 77356
Phone: 936-788-8374 or 281-364-4200
Fax: 936-788-8379
Justice of the Peace Precinct 2
Judge Trey Spikes
2241 North 1st Street
Conroe, Texas 77301
Phone: 936-538-3788
Fax: 936-538-7732

Justice of the Peace Precinct 3
Judge Matt Beasley
1520 Lake Front Circle, Suite 100
The Woodlands, Texas 77380
Phone: 281-364-4284 or 936-539-7803
Fax: 281-367-3947 or 936-539-7959

Justice of the Peace Precinct 4Judge Jason Dunn
22354 Justice Drive
New Caney, Texas 77357
Phone: 281-577-8970 or 936-521-8970
Fax: 936-521-8947 or 281-577-8947

Justice of the Peace Precinct 5
Judge Matt Masden
19100 Unity Park Drive
Magnolia, Texas 77355
Phone: 281-259-6494 or 936-539-7806
Fax: 281-259-6456 or 936-760-6989

Drug Court in Montgomery County

Drug Court is a program for positive change in program participants, staff, and the community. Using innovative practices, the program encourages participants to realize and reach their potential. The program works to enhance public safety by reducing recidivism using consistent evidence-based practices and working with the courts, participants, and treatment providers.